Young people and democracy: a troubled relationship?

If you’re 16 in the UK, you can drop out of school, get a job, pay taxes, and even join the army. Yet, in spite of all of this, you cannot vote. Governments with the ability to send people to war, change the rate of tax and change the laws to which we are all…

The Westminster game has failed. So let’s change the rules.

Our democratic deficit is deeper than anyone wants to admit. Governments are elected with  less than 37% of the vote and just 24% of all registered voters, whilst voter turnout peaks at 66%. Our upper chamber is the largest in Europe, unelected and unrepresentative of the general public. It’s no wonder why we’ve come up…

Ousting Corbyn won’t solve Labour’s core problems

Though the Labour party is in desperate need of a new leader, its real problem is that since Blair it hasn’t known what it is as a party. For Labour supporters or just anyone left of centre, the current state of the party is enough to make you weep. It has a leader wildly out of…

Theresa May offers nothing new

The whirlwind of events that transpired on Thursday morning will undoubtedly leave an indelible mark on British politics. Boris Johnson, a man who many considered to be heir apparent to the premiership, made the remarkable announcement that he would not run for Prime Minister in the wake of Michael Gove’s announcement that he would, branding…

The Pernicious Tendencies of the Referendum

Hi everyone – I’m Sahil from theforeignmonde.wordpress.com and I’m guest posting today – if you’re interested in the EU and foreign affairs etc. be sure to visit my blog.   Hugo Rifkind’s article in the Times a while ago summed up my sentiment on the EU issue in a way – all conversations are bound…

Style, not substance, is the new politics

From Jeremy Corbyn on the left to Donald Trump on the right, from Bernie Sanders in America to Pablo Iglesias in Spain and Marine Le Pen in France, outsider candidates continue to make waves across the western world. And while these politicians are certainly proposing radical (if not always new) ideas, their different policies only…

Too little, too late from Donald Trump’s opponents

When Donald Trump put forward his candidacy for the Republican nomination, most pundits wrote it off as a publicity stunt that would end in nothing. When he began to poll strongly they said that it would pass. When it didn’t, they said the problem was the huge field of candidates dividing votes amongst the moderates…

Should the UK renew Trident?

“If the third World War is fought with nuclear weapons, the fourth will be fought with bows and arrows.”    The decision of whether or not to renew Trident, Britain’s sea-based nuclear deterrent, threatens to tear apart an already deeply divided Labour party. It is an issue that puts Jeremy Corbyn, a long time believer in…

In defence of Euroscepticism

The last time the public had a vote on our relationship with the rest of Europe was in 1975. At the time this was a vote simply over whether or not we should join a ‘common market’ which is quite difficult to vehemently oppose. However, not only has the EU evolved into a political federation, but no-one…

Why Government Mass Surveillance needs to change, now

“You need the haystack to find the needle.” – Former National Security Agency Director General Keith Alexander Government surveillance today is all about exploiting the idea of surveillance for spying purposes. Today governments have been seen to be adding useless data about their people and calling this “surveillance”. Adding irrelevant data about all of the…

The media is making news, not reporting it

Labour’s cabinet reshuffle has been dominating the news for the past few days. What really ended up becoming an underwhelming restructuring of the party was portrayed as a watershed moment for it. While this really wasn’t the case, it seems that the media has tried its best to make it one (more on that later). What’s the…