Is economic globalisation incompatible with national democracy? (Part Two)

The second of a two part examination of the relationship between economic globalisation and democracy, with a particular focus on whether the two can co-exist. The first part was published on Saturday the 15th and can be found here.       Technology: a force for democracy? One way in which economic globalisation has aided…

Is economic globalisation incompatible with national democracy? (Part 1)

The first of a two part essay on the relationship between economic globalisation and democracy, with a particular focus on whether the two can co-exist. Introduction Across the Western world, economic globalisation is under attack. Whether it be Bernie Sanders, Jeremy Corbyn and the author Naomi Klein on the left, or Donald Trump, Marine Le-Pen…

2016 – A bad year for progress

To say 2016 was a bad year for progress is an understatement. A right-wing populist surge continues to sweep the Western world, bloody conflict rages on in the Middle-East, and with it comes an outpouring of refugees in unprecedented numbers. The left and the principles of liberalism as a whole have taken a beating, and…

Announcement

Since the launch of Pertinent Problems last year, we’ve managed to gain over 38000 views and 500 comments, with writers from across the globe contributing to the site. The sheer amount of content we have produced and the considerable exposure it’s received is something we’re all happy about. However, with school looming it is unlikely that…

Young people and democracy: a troubled relationship?

If you’re 16 in the UK, you can drop out of school, get a job, pay taxes, and even join the army. Yet, in spite of all of this, you cannot vote. Governments with the ability to send people to war, change the rate of tax and change the laws to which we are all…

Should India be concerned about the Northeast?

A recent attack in Assam suspected to have been carried out by the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) killed 13 people. Had this happened in a more populated and economically potent region of India, it would have received far more coverage. Yet, the unfortunate truth is attacks of this nature are all too common…

The Westminster game has failed. So let’s change the rules.

Our democratic deficit is deeper than anyone wants to admit. Governments are elected with  less than 37% of the vote and just 24% of all registered voters, whilst voter turnout peaks at 66%. Our upper chamber is the largest in Europe, unelected and unrepresentative of the general public. It’s no wonder why we’ve come up…