Is economic globalisation incompatible with national democracy? (Part Two)

The second of a two part examination of the relationship between economic globalisation and democracy, with a particular focus on whether the two can co-exist. The first part was published on Saturday the 15th and can be found here.       Technology: a force for democracy? One way in which economic globalisation has aided…

Is economic globalisation incompatible with national democracy? (Part 1)

The first of a two part essay on the relationship between economic globalisation and democracy, with a particular focus on whether the two can co-exist. Introduction Across the Western world, economic globalisation is under attack. Whether it be Bernie Sanders, Jeremy Corbyn and the author Naomi Klein on the left, or Donald Trump, Marine Le-Pen…

2016 – A bad year for progress

To say 2016 was a bad year for progress is an understatement. A right-wing populist surge continues to sweep the Western world, bloody conflict rages on in the Middle-East, and with it comes an outpouring of refugees in unprecedented numbers. The left and the principles of liberalism as a whole have taken a beating, and…

What is Obama’s Legacy?

This week’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia was about much more then Hilary Clinton officially becoming the party’s nominee, it was about the passing of the torch from Barack Obama to his former secretary of state. It was about celebrating the successes of Obama’s presidency and highlighting his substantial legacy. He will now attempt to safeguard…

Ousting Corbyn won’t solve Labour’s core problems

Though the Labour party is in desperate need of a new leader, its real problem is that since Blair it hasn’t known what it is as a party. For Labour supporters or just anyone left of centre, the current state of the party is enough to make you weep. It has a leader wildly out of…

Why the mayoral election matters more than you think

With a budget of £16 billion pounds, jurisdiction over 8 million people, and much media scrutiny, being the mayor of London comes with great responsibility. The mayor is undoubtedly both an important job in terms of power wielded as well as a feather in the cap to whichever party holds the position. Perhaps that is…

Style, not substance, is the new politics

From Jeremy Corbyn on the left to Donald Trump on the right, from Bernie Sanders in America to Pablo Iglesias in Spain and Marine Le Pen in France, outsider candidates continue to make waves across the western world. And while these politicians are certainly proposing radical (if not always new) ideas, their different policies only…

Too little, too late from Donald Trump’s opponents

When Donald Trump put forward his candidacy for the Republican nomination, most pundits wrote it off as a publicity stunt that would end in nothing. When he began to poll strongly they said that it would pass. When it didn’t, they said the problem was the huge field of candidates dividing votes amongst the moderates…

Should the UK renew Trident?

“If the third World War is fought with nuclear weapons, the fourth will be fought with bows and arrows.”    The decision of whether or not to renew Trident, Britain’s sea-based nuclear deterrent, threatens to tear apart an already deeply divided Labour party. It is an issue that puts Jeremy Corbyn, a long time believer in…

Does the House of Lords need reform?

For those of you that haven’t been keeping up with UK politics over the last few days here’s an update on recent events. David Cameron’s announcement to cut tax credits for working families was seen as controversial for two reasons: Firstly, Mr Cameron had definitively promised not to do so in the election campaign last year….

There will be no referendum for the time being

Last year after the Scottish National Party won a surge of seats north of the border, their former leader Alex Salmond bellowed “the Scottish lion has roared this morning across the country”. And yet in a BBC interview after Thursday’s SNP party conference their current leader, and First Minister for Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon announced that…

The Iran deal is progressive, not regressive

Last week’s United Nations General Assembly epitomised current relations between the USA and Iran. The handshake between Barack Obama and Mohammad Javad Zarif was the first between a US president and Iran’s top diplomat since 1979. But whilst it marked an historic step forward in Western-Iranian relations, it was nonetheless met with hostility from religious…